Flamenco

Flamenco Andalusia AndaluciaAnd here I am once again to make up for my friends’ absence (not sure whether they’re even alive!). Today I’m going to continue the “around the world” journey Lourenço started (and which I later helped, even more than once) a couple of months ago . My destination will be Spain – more precisely, Andalusia, a Spanish region.

Andalusia is one of the most visited regions in the world, mainly for its water-warm beaches (Marbella, Torremolinos, Cádiz, Tarifa and many other), and to some extent for its ski  resort Sierra Nevada. But Andalusia is more than that! It’s a region of culture mixes – they were Iberian region with more Moorish influence (it was where they settled the longest) and most probably with the highest percentage of Romani people one – but at the same time a mirror of traditional Spanish culture (for example, with the bullfighting.

It was the Romani influence that was in the origin of the style that I’m going to talk about (yeah, after 19283 words I finally get to the point!) – the Flamenco. Well, actually I’m only referring Flamenco, as I know close to nothing about it. But the little I know is totally worth sharing, and hence my post 🙂

As a guitar player, I easily got to know Paco de Lucía, not only the best Flamenco guitar player, but also one of the best guitar players of the world! As so, I think everyone should listen to him at least once in a lifetime. If you do not know him, be prepared to be amazed – his technique is impressive and his style is quite unique. I’ll share with you today his most known (and my favourite) song, Entre dos Aguas, and part of his interpretation of Concierto de Aranjuez, a classical masterpiece. Enjoy! 😉

Here you have the studio version.

And to finalize things in a softer way, here you have the beautiful Adagio part of Paco de Lucía Concierto de Aranjuez.

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Back to Australia

Today we’ll fly again to our (almost) antipodes – Australia (our antipodes are in New Zealand).

surfingI’d taken you there a few weeks ago to teach you how to write a pop song(I hope you’ve learned something with my post and that by now you’re charting, at least in your home country :P) and Lourenço did the same with the AC/DC.

Well, now I take you back there to show you a great instrumental from an Australian band – if you thought of The John Butler Trio, you got it right. I am not a great fan of them (I have been listening to them lately, trying to find whether they made other great songs, but so far I have found nothing that suits my taste :P), but this song is really amazing and worth listening. So that’s what you are going to do now by clicking in the play button below 😉

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VAkOhXIsI0]

Guitar Hero

Once again, my post has a dubious title. I am not going to write about the game, I am going to write about my guitar hero.

More or less from the mid of the last century until today, there has been a proliferation in the use of the guitar (both the old classical or the then recently develop “electric” one), increasing its prominence in the music industry. Or it might have been the other way round – the prominence of the guitar among musicians led to more people playing guitar.

This means that guitar players are usually the most recognized players of rock bands, sometimes even more than the lead singers!

Red Hot Chili PeppersI guess I can say John Frusciante is one of those guitar players. And with legitimacy – Red Hot Chili Peppers have existed and exist again without John, but they are totally not the same. All but one (the first) of the albums in which John participated had sales above 10 million, and still that first one, recorded when John was still 18, had sales 4 times bigger than their previous album (still with Slovak).

By this time you have probably understood that I am really a great fan of Frusciante and that he is my idol as a guitar player. So what I am going to say might be biased, but in my opinion he is the best guitar player of his  generation (here BBC readers agree with me) and one of the best since Hendrix (here there’s some people at Rolling Stones agreeing with me and others not so much)!

I will only bring you one song, I leave the others in playlists. It is not easy to choose one – I love lots of Chili Peppers and John songs. But bringing the choice to one, I decided to show you the most melodic solo I have ever heard and which I consider a masterpiece – the final solo of Don’t Forget Me live at Slane Castle:

Now, if you really feel like listening to the Chili Peppers, here’s a playlist containing many of my favourite Chili Peppers songs.

And one more with solo songs of John Frusciante, the man whose this post is about, after all!

At last, I leave you a video of John teaching how to play Under the Bridge and not only, hoping that this helps the ones learning guitar: